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WHAT IS A NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL?

In June, 1999, the voters of Los Angeles approved a new City Charter which created the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment (DONE). Its purpose is to promote more citizen participation in government and to make government more responsive to local needs through a citywide network of neighborhood councils. Each council is responsible for representing the diverse interests of its “Stakeholders.” The council advises city council members and departments on the needs of Glassell Park.

WHO ARE GLASSELL PARK’S “STAKEHOLDERS?”

In Glassell Park, a stakeholder is anyone who lives, works, owns property, or owns or operates a business within the Glassell Park Neighborhood Council (GPNC) boundaries, and/or anyone who declares a stake in the neighborhood and affirms the factual basis for it. GPNC membership is open to all Stakeholders.

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BOUNDARIES

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Northwest: San Fernando along City of Glendale boundary (E) to the  2 Fwy/Las Plumas

Southwest: City of Glendale boundary along San Fernando/railroad tracks (S) to Los Angeles/Division St.

Northeast: Glendale 2 Fwy/York (E) toward Eagle Rock Blvd (S) to El Paso Dr. (E) to Division St.

Southteast: Los Angeles River/Division St. (N) along Division St. toward El Paso Dr.

OPEN TO ALL STAKEHOLDERS

Glassell Park Neighborhood Council was certified by the City in January 2002. Board Member elections are held every two years. Any stakeholder 18 years of age or older is eligible to run for a seat on the Governing Board.

To get involved, we encourage you to attend and participate in our meetings of the Board and all committees. Much help is needed in all areas. To call attention to a community problem or suggest something for our agenda please visit the Board Members page.

WHEN ARE THE BOARD MEETINGS?

The Board meets on the 3rd Tuesday of the month 7pm at the Glassell Park Community and Senior Center, 3750 Verdugo Rd. The Executive Committee meets on the 1st Tuesday of the month to set the agenda for the Board meetings. Please note that the Board may only vote and take action on items on the agenda. To request an item be added to the agenda please submit it for consideration at the Executive Committee meeting.

CAN I SPEAK AT A COUNCIL MEETING?

The public may comment on a specific item listed on the agenda when the Board considers that item. When the Board considers the agenda item entitled “Public Comments,” the public has the right to comment on any matter that is within the Board’s jurisdiction. If you wish to make a presentation, please contact the Executive Committee prior to the Executive Committee meeting to be agendized.

WHAT IS THE BROWN ACT AND HOW DOES IT APPLY?

The Brown Act will generally apply when there is a quorum or majority of the governing body of a Neighborhood Council present. The essential provisions that should be complied with include: meetings must be open (§ 54953.3); agendas of meetings must be posted 72 hours in advance for regular meetings and 24 hours in advance for special meetings (§ 54954.2 and § 54956); at the meeting the legislative body is limited to acting on the matters on the agenda (§ 54954.2); members of the public must be given an opportunity to speak to the legislative body on agenda items and non-agenda items within the jurisdiction of the Neighborhood Council ballots or deliberations are permitted (§ 54953); and agendas of public meetings and any other distributed writings are public records and shall be made available upon request without delay (§ 54957.5).

Because the City Charter created Neighborhood Councils, Neighborhood Councils are subject to the provisions of the Brown Act. The Brown Act is applicable to “a commission, committee, board, or other body of a local agency, whether permanent or temporary, decision making or advisory, created by charter, ordinance, resolution or formal action of a legislative body.“ § 54952 (b)

The Brown Act applies to neighborhood council committees if the committee has an ongoing jurisdiction over a specific matter and it is considered a standing committee. However, if a Neighborhood Council establishes a temporary committee to review and make recommendations on a specific task or issue, the Brown Act does not apply because after the committee finishes its review and has given recommendations to the full governing body of the Neighborhood Council, the committee would be disbanded and thus no longer has jurisdiction over that matter. However, the temporary committee must comprise less than a quorum of the governing body, or else the Brown Act will apply since its provisions govern “meetings” of a legislative body at which a majority of the members are present. (Ralph M. Brown Act § 54952(b))